need advice which course to attend

Discussion in 'IT Careers and Certification' started by jmr2910, May 19, 2008.

  1. jmr2910

    jmr2910 Geek Trainee

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    Im based in the U.K amd i am basic computer literate, i wish to take a career change into networking, my brain is beginning to fry with the conflicting information i have received on the cost, time of and reputable companies i should use to take the courses. Eventually i wish to take the CCNA. According to Computeach i should take IT essentials (20 hours), CompTIA+ (250 hours +5 in centre days)), Network+ (200 hours +3 in centre days) and then CCNA (450 hours + 5 in centre days. Total cost £5950 .
    From e-careers.co.uk i can do CompTIA+ (120hours), then CCNA (180hours). Total cost £595 .
    Or i could go to a boot camp in Goa (India) at Koenig IT school for 1 on 1 tuition CompTIA+ 9 days (£630) Network+ 6 days (£440) and CCNA 9 days (£680) ( Koenig includes hotel and food).
    If anyone can help in any way from the best companies to use or the best courses to take it would be appreciated......... Thanks :doh:
     
  2. Impotence

    Impotence May the source be with u!

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    I'm fairly sure you can do the Cisco CCNA online for free (studying for it, i would guess you have to pay for the exam!)
     
  3. zeus

    zeus out of date

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    I have thought about doing the microsoft certificates for years but was always been put off by all these companies offering training for the MS exams. They charge too much.
    I bought a MS Press book for the 70-290 exam. See how I get on! Others have passed just from using the book and lectures MS have online. I paid £15 for the book... you get Server 2003 Enterprise 180 day trial with the book too.

    I spoke to a few people that work in computing... all said do a degree in computing and get some work experiance.
    You can do an Open Uni degree for the price of one MS cert with computeach. Having said that you will get the OU course for free if you earn less than £30k ish.

    OU is fookin' hard if you are working. Im on my 5th qualification with them now. (1 degree, 2 diplomas and 2 certs) Didnt do computing though.... physics, maths, nat sciences and astronomy.

    Im all ears for peoples routes to MCSA, MCSE, MCDBA etc in the UK. How did you pass!?
     
  4. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    I'll offer my advice as somebody who's already in the industry, though I'm on another continent, and not necessarily in the same career path as you might want (sysadmin).

    I don't think anyone much cares about the Net+; at least I got mine in 2001 and so far nobody's cared. As for MCSE, it does hold some merit if you want to work in a Windows shop, e.g. "Sr. Malware Cleaner"© or "Certified Exchange Rebooter"™. Yeah, I'm a bit cynical, but I got out of Windows for a reason. ;) Still, not all shops use Windows, but I haven't worked in a shop yet that didn't have at least a few Cisco routers. Plus, general network knowledge carries over, whereas MS knowledge is strictly proprietary (and quickly forgotten -- take my word for it!).

    In your shoes, I'd spend my limited time and resources working towards certifications of more general technology, then gradually specialize as you get a better idea which direction you want your career to go.

    All the best,
    -Chris (AT)
     
  5. megamaced

    megamaced Geek Geek Geek!

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    The MCSE accreditation goes some way to prove your skills and will certainly help you get one foot through the door come interview, but then its up to you to show what you can do. Nothing beats real world experience.

    I achieved MCSE by self tutoring. I simply bought the necessary Microsoft Press books and studied them. I am fortunate because my work allows study leave, so I had the time to read the books.

    I personally felt that I walked away with a lot of extra know-how having completed MCSE. I am much better technically now than I was. I never subscribed to the exam cram culture that surrounds many IT technicians and therefore I actually remember most of the stuff I learned! The idea of sitting a two week course to complete the 70-290 exam for example, is ludicrous. What can you possibly learn in two weeks? The problem with most IT colleges today is that they teach you how to pass the exam, and not how to resolve issues in the real world. I'd personally recommend to anyone that they do away with tutor lead lessons and their ridiculously high charges, and simply buy the books and study in your own time.
     

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