PSU Trips Circuit Breaker...

Discussion in 'Power Supplies and UPS's' started by reikozunaken, Mar 5, 2009.

  1. reikozunaken

    reikozunaken Geek Trainee

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    After spending a few hours of careful labor putting my computer together, I plugged it in and turned it on to begin the arduous installation process. All went well and after a day of work, my computer was finished. I turned it off to go to bed.

    The next day, the power button didn't respond when I pressed it, so I flipped the on/off switch in the back of the PSU. When I flipped it back on, my entire room went black! I couldn't reset my circuit unless I unplugged my computer. From then on, if I even just plug it in, the breaker gets tripped.

    I've tried looking around for people with similar problems, but I haven't found any so far. My dad suspects that I have this problem because the PSU takes 13A input and the circuit breaker shows that I get only 15. I find it strange that I can't find anyone else with this problem since most sites hide the amp information.

    Is there something I can do without having to get a new PSU? Could the PSU is defective? If I do need a new PSU, what should I look for in order to avoid this again (assuming it's the circuit breaker)?

    PSU is probably a bit of an overkill, but I wanted to make sure everything would run. For reference, my system components are below:

    Ultra X3 1000 Watt PSU
    ASUS M3A79-T Deluxe Motherboard
    AMD Phenom II X4 940 + heatsink
    HIS Radeon HD 4870
    Auzentech X-Fi Prelude
    Thermaltake Armor+ MX Case
    2 DVD drives
    1 IDE hard drive
    2 SATA hard drives
    3 case fans
    Edit:
    Mushkin 4GB RAM (2 sticks)
     
  2. RHochstenbach

    RHochstenbach Administrator Staff Member

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    If the Circuit Breaker shuts down when you connect your computer, that means that the PSU might be defective. It usually happens when the 'hot' wire touches the ground wire.

    You should only look at the amps when a fuse breaks when turning on the computer.
     
  3. reikozunaken

    reikozunaken Geek Trainee

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    So does that mean there is no way that the amp requirement is causing an issue, even though it sounds like it takes 13/15 of my amps? I want to try to avoid waiting several weeks of troubleshooting...
     
  4. RHochstenbach

    RHochstenbach Administrator Staff Member

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    When the power is out, do you need to replace a fuse or do you need to switch the lever of the circuit breaker? Only when the fuse needs to be replaced every time, it's got something to do with the amps. If not, then it's caused by what I said earlier (hot wire touches the ground wire).
     
  5. reikozunaken

    reikozunaken Geek Trainee

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    Cool stuff. Thanks for the info. I've got a new PSU on the way and I'm getting refunded for my old one. Props to Tigerdirect for having amazingly simple return procedures!
     

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