How to share DSL

Discussion in 'Networking and Computer Security' started by Mack, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    OK i have got a router now but don't know how to share the connection between my PC and my friends.
    MY PC
    P3 1Ghz
    3Com NIC network card
    O.S. Windows 2000 Advanced Server

    My Friends PC
    AMD Athlon 2Ghz
    O.S Windows XP Home edition

    I know that telling me everthing would take a long time so, to save time can someone just post alink to a good site, so that i could easily connect both PC's.
    In the meanwhile i will keep on searching as well,.....
     
  2. dansicotte

    dansicotte Geek Trainee

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    Why not use the VPN features of the Advanced Server OS.

    You say you have Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server, you could always use your router to do port-forwarding (in this case port 1723). Just make sure your Advanced Server uses a Static IP on the inside of your network, then setup the router to do "port forwarding" of port 1723 to the IP address of your Advanced Server.

    Then you would setup "RAS" (Remote Access Services) on your Windows 2000 Advanced Server, enable PPTP (Point to Point Tunneling Protocol) and then set your friend up with a local or domain user account. Make sure you tag his account to allow him in via "RAS".

    Then he would just use the built-in VPN networking features of XP to connect to your PPTP server.

    Only problem would be if you are one of the guys without a static IP address.. Then you'd either have to tell him your current IP all the time before he connects, and or register a domain name and use an external company (and monthly fee) to give you "Dynamic DNS" services for your domain. Basically your router should support most of the popular DYDns services out there, and every time your routers external IP address changes, the router automatically contacts the DYDns company to update your DNS entries for your domain.

    Take Care,
     
  3. dansicotte

    dansicotte Geek Trainee

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    Just to clearify.

    My oniginal post was to help you and your buddy connect to each other over the Internet.

    Take Care.
     
  4. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Though I don't have much experience in networking but i will try to follow your instructions,.... thanks
     
  5. dansicotte

    dansicotte Geek Trainee

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  6. Big B

    Big B HWF Godfather

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    Those are great links.

    *stickied*
     
  7. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    I have checked some of the links and it seems that i have to study some terminology in order to understand. I almost don't know anything about netwkring.
    Anyway i was able to connect the two PC, but via switch not by a router. I have the MSN firewall installed on the PC. I will install the router after learning some networking from the above links.
    By the way, what are the disadvantages in using the swtich instead of the router, apart from the security ones.
     
  8. dansicotte

    dansicotte Geek Trainee

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    Long, but explains switch vs. router in laymans terms.

    SWITCH:
    --------------
    - Well, the main difference is that a switch simply connects "ethernet devices" together to allow them to communicate with each other; Some examples would be like PC's with network cards, or printers with built-in network cards, or any other product or device with "ethernet", these would connect to an Ethernet switch to allow them all to communicate with each other.

    - Ethernet comes in 4 basic types, 10 Megabit (10base "Ethernet"), 100 Megabit (100base-T "Fast Ethernet"), 1000 Megabit (1000base "Gigabit Ethernet"), and 10G (10000base "10 Gigabit Ethernet").

    (Each newer Ethernet flavor is 10X faster than the previous version)

    Below are the specs for each type:

    10 Megabit = 10,000,000 bits per second
    100 Megabit = 100,000,000 bits per second
    1000 Megabit = 1,000,000,000 bits per second
    10000 Megabit = 10,000,000,000 bits per second

    Other Terms:

    "Ethernet" is really a code word for "CSMA/CD" or (Carrier Sense, Multiple Access, with Collision Detection),
    as you can see it's much easier to just call it "Ethernet".

    10base-2 (old style RG58 coax cable, just uses a core and jacket to do signaling,
    50 ohm terminators at ends of bus)
    (10base-2 can also come in "Thick-net and Thin-net" types of cable)

    10base-T (newer type, using unshielded-twisted-pair, pins 1,2,3,and 6 with an RJ45 connector)
    100base-T (same as above, except faster)
    100base-SX (uses fiber optic cables)
    1000base-SX (uses fiber optic cables, up to 2 kilometer long connections)
    1000base-LX/LH (uses fiber optic cables and long-haul lasers for up to 10 kilometer connections)
    1000base-ZX (uses fiber optic cables and long-haul lasers for up to 100 kilometer connections)
    10000base-X/SX/CX/LX/SR/T (Ten-Gigabit Ethernet, many, many types of cable and media)

    * One thing all types of Ethernet have in common is that every individual device has it's own individually unique address in the world. These hardware addresses are called "MAC" addresses, or "Media Access Control" addresses. These underlying unique identities are the basis of all communications between devices.

    - Ethernet just connects the devices at the lower level, the hardware level, and Ethenet Hubs and switches make this happen. The higher level communication, like the data the computers pass to one another is the real reason your are connecting them. In order for them to do pass the data from one to another, they need to be connected via ethernet, and speaking the same language. Think of think of their language being something called a "protocol", or a code-language both sides understands. These "protocols" come in many different types, suited for different purposes.

    Protocol Examples:
    (think of these as different languages spoken over Ethernet):
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    TCP = Transmission Control Protocol
    (creates and maintains the link for both devices to pass IP packets).

    IP = Internet Protocol
    (The most common routable protocol used today)

    IPX/SPX = Made by Novel, Internet Packet Exchange
    (This protocol comes with Windows OS's, and Novell Clients)

    NetBeui = NetBIOS Frames Protocol
    (Originally from IBM, good for up to 80 nodes, fastest non-routable protocol)

    UDP = User Datagram Protocol
    (Connectionless Protocol, simply broadcasted out in hopes of reaching destination)

    - The most popular and routable protocol is IP (Internet Protocol). This is the protocol your ISP requires you to use in order to connect to the Internet.

    ROUTERS:
    ------------------
    - A router has two or more sides. Think of it this way. Draw a square box, then divide it in half. One half of the square is the LAN side, and the other half is your WAN side. The LAN side of the router or "local area network" side, is the part you plug all your PC's and other ethernet devices into. The WAN side of the router or "wide area network" side, is the part that you plug into you DSL modem, or Cable modem into, or whatever "box" your ISP gives you. If you had Sprint Broadband Wireless, then you would plug your wireless end-point into the WAN side of your router.

    - Once connected and configured the LAN side of your router becomes the gateway for all other ethernet devices to "go through" in order to get to the Internet. Each Ethernet device on the LAN will be configured to send all it's Internet-bound communications to the LAN side of the router, from there the router will send those communications through the router's WAN port, to your DSL modem, or Cable modem, and from there to your ISP, and from there to the Internet, from the internet to the desired host - somewhere our in "cyberspace", and then all the way back again.

    - These "communications" consist of digital data (ones and zeros) packaged in "IP" or Internet Protocol packets. These packets contain the data your computer uses to say, browse a web site, pay your bills online, or buy tickets online for a concert.

    - Many different types of routers exist for different purposes. The kind of home use, are usually easy to set up if you follow the directions they come with, or read their online documentation for their product. I could go on and on about the details of TCP/IP communications but you were wondering about the differences between an switch and a router.

    - So basically the main difference between a switch and a router is that a switch only operates at the harware level, and at the MAC address level (layer 2 max), and a router operates at the protocol level, which is layer 3 of the 7-layer OSI model.

    The seven layers of the OSI Basic Reference Model are (from bottom to top):

    1. The Physical Layer describes the physical properties of the various communications media, as well as the electrical properties and interpretation of the exchanged signals. Ex: this layer defines the size of Ethernet coaxial cable, the type of BNC connector used, and the termination method.

    2. The Data Link Layer describes the logical organization of data bits transmitted on a particular medium. Ex: this layer defines the framing, addressing and checksumming of Ethernet packets.

    3. The Network Layer describes how a series of exchanges over various data links can deliver data between any two nodes in a network. Ex: this layer defines the addressing and routing structure of the Internet.

    4. The Transport Layer describes the quality and nature of the data delivery. Ex: this layer defines if and how retransmissions will be used to ensure data delivery.

    5. The Session Layer describes the organization of data sequences larger than the packets handled by lower layers. Ex: this layer describes how request and reply packets are paired in a remote procedure call.

    6. The Presentation Layer describes the syntax of data being transferred. Ex: this layer describes how floating point numbers can be exchanged between hosts with different math formats.

    7. The Application Layer describes how real work actually gets done. Ex: this layer would implement file system operations.

    - Some other common features and uses of a router include:

    Packet Filtering
    Firewall
    NAT (Network Adress Translation)
    port forwarding
    remote access
    general security
    routing between subnets (many seperate networks connected together via routers, like the Internet)

    - I'm tired and think I'm going to quit for now.. But if you have read all this, then you have a pretty good understanding of the differences between a switch and a router.

    Take Care.
     
  9. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Thanks man, real piece of work. Sorry you had go through all that trouble because of my ignorance, but after reading your article and some of Big B's Links, I think, I am getting atleast some kind of idea about the working of the router.
    By the way I have the BESFR41. I also visited the website and downloaded the documentation for the router. Right now, my exams are coming (Eng. & Eco.) this week, so I won't have much time to study it, but I think, I will get it working in about two weeks time.
    You guys will be the first ones to know about it.
    I really appreciate all the help,
    Thanks
    :read: Mack
     
  10. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Hi,
    I have got some good news and some bad news.

    Good News:
    After searching for days on the net, I came to know that I don't require a Router, because I have the Westell 2200 modem, which has the router feature already built in. Moreover, Verizon also provided MSN Premium software, which includes the MSN security system (which consists of Mcafee Firwall plus and virus scan).
    Perhaps this is the reason that i wasn't able to setup my router easy, because i was bascially connecting a router with a router.

    Bad News:
    Now the bad news. Because I have already bought the router, so I have incurred a loss of $30.00.
     
  11. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    Well, you'd be surprised when and where an extra router can come in handy. Think about it -- how many friends or relatives do you know who have broadband and no router? You can always sell/loan/give it to one of those, or even sell it here on the forums.
     
  12. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    hhumm, Well I haven't really sold any of my computer parts before, but I guess you are right, I might be able to sell it to one of my friends. Thanks for tip :good:
     
  13. Big B

    Big B HWF Godfather

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    Having extra computer parts is never a bad thing, even if they're old and aren't good performers anymore, they can still be very useful in diagnosing problems.
     

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