Installing Fedora 32bit ONLY

Discussion in 'Linux, BSD and Other OS's' started by Mack, Jul 1, 2009.

  1. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Hi, I am trying to install Red Hat Fedora 9 in vmware but get an error stating that

    "This kernel requires an x86-64 CPU, but only detected an i686 CPU.
    Unable to boot - please use a kernel appropriate for your cpu"

    I later found that since my notebook (Intel T6400) doesn't support VT, I can't install a 64bit Guest OS in VMware. However, the Fedora DVD says both 32bit and 64bit. Is there a way I can install the 32bit instead of the 64bit?


    The Following are the notebook specs:
    HP Pavillion DV4t
    Core2duo T6400 (Doesn't have VT Technology)
    4GB DDR2 800
    320GB HD
    X4500

    VMware Version: 6.15 build-126130
    Host OS : Vista Home Premium 64bit

    Thanks
     
  2. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    after quite a bit of searching on net, you need to enter a "boot perameter" into GRUB for it then to pass boot params onto the kernel, sorry i couldn't be more helpful

    if you find fedora's boot perams please post it on this thead, because i didn't have any luck finding them

    Edit: in theory it should be something like "x86" but who knows[ot]probably AT[/ot]
     
  3. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Thanks for the effort. I googled Fedora 9 setups and it seems that there are two different setups 32bit (3.3GB) and 64bit (3.8GB). Mine is 3.8GB, so I am guessing that it might not contain a 32bit Setup, though the cover states "supports 32bit and 64bit"
     
  4. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    The official Fedora spin of Linux has either 32-bit or 64-bit, but not both. My guess is you have an x86_64 disc, which is for the AMD64 architecture. It sounds like it might mean x86 & amd64, but it's really just AMD64. You can download the i386 version of Fedora from any of their mirrors. Also, the latest version is 11, so 9's a bit outdated anyway.
     
  5. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    [ot]
    told you, god knew[/ot]
     
  6. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Do you guys have any idea about the differences between Linux and Solaris; in the context that if after or during my linux studies, if i switch over to Solaris, would I experience a Drastic change?
     
  7. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    well they are different animals, so probaly

    e.g. Solaris is Unix but linux is a Unix-like OS
    to clarify: linux is a kernel whereas Unix contains a kernel with support provided by a hardware vender such as IBM, HP or Sun

    finally: Unix has being kicking about longer than linux and therfore it's more mature

    Edit: i think you would find your liinux skills need a lot of work if you switched to Solaris

    Edit: and Solaris is to Unix slimilaly as Gentoo is to linux - both have a very steep learning curve
     
  8. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    The biggest difference right now is that Linux definitely has a future and Solaris' is less certain. Really though, Solaris is nice enough, but it's on the decline. Even Sun (now owned by Oracle) uses the GNU stack with their own kernel.

    Solaris has some cool features, but Linux is better in nearly every way. Solaris is also a bit of a pain to manage as compared with Linux, and requires some special knowledge that doesn't apply to Linux or the BSDs.

    That said, there are some niche fields that use Solaris rather heavily, so it would be beneficial to know. I just wouldn't make it a priority over learning Linux, since there's a lot more work for skilled Linux admins, and I imagine that trend will only continue.
     
  9. Mack

    Mack Big Geek

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    Actually, my elder bro is into managing SAN networks in Dubai. According to him Linux is quickly gaining grounds compared to UNIX (and hence Solaris), however, in the middle east market Linux hasn't gained that much fame compared to Solaris. He himself works on Solaris.

    I personally prefer Linux (interms of learning ease) because books, tutorials and help is more readily available compared to Solaris. However, there is chance I might end up working on Solaris (because of bro)
     
  10. sabashuali

    sabashuali Ani Ma'amin

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    [ot]I am intrigued... to the point where I would like to see what it looks like on my laptop. Unfortunately, Sun do not provide a LiveCD... the nearest thing is Belenix which is an OpenSolaris based distro. I wonder if it will give the same feel therefore a good Solaris experience? Only one way to find out I suppose...[/ot]
     
  11. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    :confused: LiveCD of OpenSolaris is here
     
  12. sabashuali

    sabashuali Ani Ma'amin

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    [ot] Sorry everyone! last ot promise.... :O Thanks Donkey... seem to have completely overlooked the obvious! Downloading now.... :cool: [/ot]
     
  13. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    OpenSolaris is not Solaris, just bear that in mind. They're actually quite different.
     
  14. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    np, overlook as often as you like

    i like getting the thanks :beer:
     
  15. sabashuali

    sabashuali Ani Ma'amin

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    Really? So how come it bears the name? Is the Kernel of Solaris? Is the FS similar? Is the architecture identical? What is the actual concept if the two are different?
     
  16. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    dunno, i too assumed they same / similar, now downloading both to see
     
  17. sabashuali

    sabashuali Ani Ma'amin

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    Oh well... no space on my laptop, will have to run Solaris on VirtualBox on my Windows (blah) rig...
     
  18. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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    aawww, Saba gets his pet lip out :doh:
     
  19. Anti-Trend

    Anti-Trend Nonconformist Geek Staff Member

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    Try getting to this article that explains the differences:

    https://wikis.sun.com/display/OpenSolarisInfo200906/OpenSolaris+and+Solaris+Feature+Differences

    Once you become frustrated with their mentality, you will understand why so many were only too happy to migrate from Solaris to Linux. :)

    As an aside, I'll give you the differences in a nutshell. OpenSolaris is to Solaris what Fedora is to Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The former moves faster and is more community-oriented, though it's not open-source in the same sense that Fedora is.The latter is geared towards long-term support and maintainability with only bugfixes and security patches over time.
     
  20. donkey42

    donkey42 plank

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